The Portion Plate Explained

Download printable sheets below with food groups that you can cut out and use to decorate  your portion plate: click on the image then right click to save or print.

Carbohydrates.

starch

Bread, Cereals, Potatoes, Pasta and Rice.

1 Portion is your fist size or:

1 slice of brown sliced bread or wholegrain soda bread, 2-3 crackers or crispbreads,  4 dessertspoons flake type high fibre breakfast cereal  with out sugar, honey or chocolate coating, 3 dessertspoons dry porridge oats, 2 breakfast cereal wheat or oat biscuits,  3 dessertspoons muesli, without sugar or honey coating, 1 medium or 2 small potatoes, 2 dessertspoons of mashed potatoes,3 dessertspoons or 1/2 cup boiled pasta, rice, noodles (25g/1 oz uncooked), 1 cup of yam or plantain.

  • Choose any 6 or more portions each day for all ages and up to 12 portions if you are active.
  • Body size is important too. Younger, smaller children (5-13 years) need less than older children.
  • Teenage boys, men and older men need more portions than girls or women.
  • Most men need about 8 portions a day and most women need about 6 portions

_______________________________________________________

Fruit and Vegetables:

fruit_and_veg

1 Portion is your fist size or:

1 medium apple, orange,banana, pear or similar size fruit,  2 small fruits – plums, kiwis or similar size fruit, 10-12 berries, grapes or cherries, ½ a grapefruit, 1 heaped dessertspoon of raisins or sultanas,  4 dessertspoons of cooked fresh, fruit, fruit tinned in own juice or frozen fruit, 4 dessertspoons of cooked vegetables – fresh or frozen a bowl of salad – lettuce, tomato,cucumber  a bowl of homemade vegetable soup, 1 small corn on the cob or 4 heaped dessertspoons of sweetcorn  a small glass (100ml) of unsweetened fruit juice or a smoothie made only from fruit or vegetables.

  • All age groups need at least 5 Portions a day and more.

__________________________________________________________________

Protein:

Meat, Poultry, Fish, Eggs, Beans and Nuts

protein

1 Portion is the palm of your hand or:

50-75g/2-3oz cooked lean beef, pork, lamb, lean mince, chicken(This is about 100g/4oz of raw meat or poultry and is about the size of a pack of cards) 100g/4oz cooked oily fish (salmon,mackerel, sardines) or white fish (cod, haddock, plaice) 2 eggs- limit to 7 eggs a week, 100g/4oz soya or tofu,  125g/5oz hummus, 6 dessertspoons of peas, beans(includes baked beans) or lentils, 40g/1.5oz unsalted nuts or peanut butter or seeds,100-150g/4-6oz cooked meat or 200g/8oz fish is equal to 2 servings.

  •  Choose any 2 portions each day.

_______________________________________________________

Milk, Yogurt and Cheese

dairy

1 Portion is:

1 large glass (200ml) low fat or low fat fortified milk, 1 large glass (200ml) calcium enriched Soya milk,  1 small carton yogurt (125ml), 1 yogurt drink (200ml), 1 small carton fromage frais,  25g/1oz (matchbox size piece) of low fat cheddar or semi-soft cheese, 50g/2oz low fat soft cheese, 2 processed cheese triangles, 75g/3oz cottage cheese, 1 portion of milk pudding made with a large glass low fat milk.

  • Choose any 3
  • Children aged 9-18 years need 5 portions a day.
  • Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding need 3 portions a day

For further advice on healthy eating  see

http://www.safefood.eu/Home.aspx

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Get Wise about Portion Size

A group of parents in Terenure have launched a ‘healthy eating’ initiative to address the increasing trend towards childhood obesity. The goal of this “Get wise about portion size campaign is to promote healthier eating for our children by educating them on portion sizes and wise food choices. Parents, schools, local shops and businesses, resident groups, sports clubs and health representatives have all being asked to give their support, to target the widest possible audience

The Portion Plate

Our children will be making a ‘’portion plate’’ in school or at home as homework. To learn how to make a Portion Plate and for more information, please see video above. 

The Portion Plate is a simple tool for learning how much you should eat as part of your diet. Not only does the plate show you how much to eat, but it also teaches the components of a healthy, balanced meal. The plate’s messages are simple:

When you eat a meal, try to make half your plate fruits and vegetables, eat more whole grains, and don’t oversize your portions. By making the plate it will help our children to remember to eat a variety of foods as part of a nutritious, balanced diet.

How does the plate work?

It’s a memory aid. Our children will make a portion plate from a paper plate as an art project. By making the plate our children will learn how much and what makes up a balanced meal. In short, the plate will help our children to remember healthy eating habits every time they sit down to eat. Even when they are not at home, they will remember the visual cues of the plate and be less tempted to overload their portions. For tips and information, like us on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/portionwise or follow us on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/portionwise123

How to make a portion plate

Know your portion size for 2014

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Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings

Per Day

 
  Children Teens Adults  
2-3 4-8 9-13 14-18 Years 19-50 Years 51+ Years  
Girls and Boys Female Male Female Male Female Male  
Vegetables and Fruit 4 5 6 7 8 7-8 8-10 7 7  
Grain Products 3 4 6 6 7 6-7 8 6 7  
Milk and Alternatives 2 2 3-4 3-4 3-4 2 2 3 3  
Meat and Alternatives 1 1 1-2 2 3 2 3 2 3

For example:

If you are a 35 year old woman you should aim to have:

  • 7-8 vegetables and fruit
  • 6-7 grain products
  • 2 milk and alternatives
  • 2 meat and alternatives
  • 30 – 45 mL (2 to 3 Tbsp) of unsaturated oils and fats

If you are very active and lots and lots of sports every day and need more food, choose extra Food Guide Servings from the four food groups.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/basics-base/serving-portion-eng.php

 Examples of one Food Guide Serving are:

Vegetables and Fruit:

  • 125 mL (½ cup) fresh, frozen or canned 
    vegetable or fruit or 100% juice
  • 250 mL (1 cup) leafy raw vegetables or
    salad
  • 1 piece of fruit

Grain Products

  • 1 slice (35 g) bread or ½ bagel (45 g)
  • ½ pita (35 g) or ½ tortilla (35 g)
  • 125 mL (½ cup) cooked rice, pasta, or couscous
  • 30 g cold cereal or 175 mL (¾ cup) hot cereal

Milk and Alternatives

  • 250 mL (1 cup) milk or fortified soy beverage
  • 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt
  • 50 g (1 ½ oz.) cheese

Meat and Alternatives

  • 75 g (2 ½ oz.)/125 mL (½ cup) cooked fish, shellfish, poultry or lean meat
  • 175 mL (¾ cup) cooked beans
  • 2 eggs
  • 30 mL (2 Tbsp) peanut butter

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/basics-base/serving-portion-eng.php

How much food?

The amount of food you serve varies for different family members. For example, preschooler’s need fewer Food Guide Servings from some food groups than older children and teens. What’s important is knowing that everyone has consumed their recommended number of Food Guide Servings from each of the four food groups by the end of the day.

Learn more about Food Guide Servings.

It’s okay to have more or less than one Food Guide Serving

You may serve yourself the same amount as one Food Guide Serving while other family members may want more or less than one Food Guide Serving.

For example:

  • A two year old boy may only eat half a Food Guide Serving of meat at dinner while a 30 year old male may serve himself two Food Guide Servings of meat at dinner.
  • A preschooler may drink only 125 mL (1/2 cup) of milk, which equals half a Food Guide Serving while a teenage boy may drink 500 mL (2 cups) of milk, which equals two Food Guide Servings.

You can spread your Food Guide Servings throughout the day.

For example:

  • You could have 25 g (about 1 oz.) of meat in a salad at lunch and 50 g (about 2 oz.) of meat or poultry at supper. That adds up to 75 g (2 ½ oz.)/125 mL , (½ cup) of meat which equals to one Food Guide Serving of meat and alternatives.
  • You could have one egg plus 15 mL (1 Tbsp) of peanut butter which adds up to one Food Guide Serving of meat and alternatives.

 

Family of two adults and two children

The Wong family includes mom, dad and two children; Sophie, 3 and Colin, 5. The children don’t need as many Food Guide Servings from the Vegetables and Fruit and Grain Products groups as their parents. Mom and dad have to fit more of these foods into their day. The whole family takes a bag lunch and packs along their snacks. Here’s what one day of eating might look like.

Table – Examples of Meals for Different Families

Sophie 
age 3

Colin 
age 5

Mom
age 33

Dad
age 35

Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per day.

Vegetables and fruit

4 5 7 to 8 8 to 10

Grain Products

3 4 6 to 7 8

Milk and Alternatives

2 2 2 2

Meat and Alternatives

1 1 2 3

Meals

Breakfast

Smoothie made with 60 ml (¼ cup) frozen berries and 125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk15 g whole grain cereal with 125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk Smoothie made with 60 ml (¼ cup) frozen berries and 125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk30 g whole grain cereal with 125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk Smoothie made with 125 ml (½ cup) frozen berries and 250 mL (1 cup) 2% milk1 slice whole wheat toast

1 boiled egg

Smoothie made with 125 ml (½ cup) frozen berries and 250 mL (1 cup) 2% milk2 slices whole wheat toast

2 boiled eggs

Snack

½ sliced banana
water
1 banana
water
1 banana
water
1 banana
water

Lunch

125 mL (½ cup) butternut squash soup½ tuna wrap made with 37.5 g (1 ¼ oz.) tuna and 60 mL (¼ cup) green peppers slices wrapped in ½ whole wheat tortilla

125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk

125 mL (½ cup) butternut squash soup½ tuna wrap made with 37.5 g (1 ¼ oz.) tuna and 60 mL (¼ cup) green peppers slices wrapped in ½ whole wheat tortilla

125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk

250 mL (1 cup) butternut squash soup1 tuna wrap made with 37.5 g (1¼ oz.) tuna and 125 mL (½ cup) green peppers slices wrapped in 1 whole wheat tortilla

250 mL (1 cup) 2% milk

250 mL (1 cup) butternut squash soup1 ½ tuna wrap made with 75 g (2 ½ oz.) tuna and 125 mL (½ cup) green peppers slices wrapped in 1 ½ whole wheat tortilla

250 mL (1 cup) 2% milk

Snack

60 mL (¼ cup) carrots125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk 125 mL (½ cup) carrots125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk 125 mL (½ cup) carrots 125 mL (½ cup) carrots

Supper

125 mL (½ cup) stir fried broccoli, carrots and cauliflower [frozen medley]125 mL (½ cup) brown rice

37.5 g (1¼ oz.) stir fried chicken

125 mL (½ cup) stir fried broccoli, carrots and cauliflower [frozen medley]125 mL (½ cup) brown rice

37.5 g (1 ¼ oz.) stir fried chicken

125 mL (½ cup) stir fried broccoli, carrots and cauliflower [frozen medley]250 mL (1 cup) brown rice

75 g (2 ½ oz.) stir fried chicken

250 mL (1 cup) stir fried broccoli, carrots and cauliflower [frozen medley]250 mL (1 cup) brown rice

75 g (2 ½ oz.) stir fried chicken

Snack

30 g dry cereal 30 g dry cereal 500 mL (2 cups) plain popcorn 500 mL (2 cups) plain popcorn

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/using-utiliser/plan/3_1_1_1-eng.php

Single mom with one child and help from grandmother

Susan lives with her 10 year old daughter Erin. Her mother Lillian lives close by and has meals with the family while she keeps an eye on her granddaughter. Susan buys her lunch at work, while Erin goes home to have lunch with her grandmother. Lillian makes the family supper and often cooks extra soup or stew to freeze for another day.

Table – Examples of Meals for Different Families

Erin
Age 10

Susan
Age 45

Lillian
Age 72

Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per day.

Vegetables and fruit

6 7 to 8 7

Grain Products

6 6 to 7 6

Milk and Alternatives

3 to 4 2 3

Meat and Alternatives

1 to 2 2 2

Meals

Breakfast

2 slices of French toast with 125 mL (½ cup) canned peaches250 mL (1 cup) of milk 2 slices of French toast with 125 mL (½ cup) canned peaches 2 slices of French toast with 125 mL (½ cup) canned peaches1 orange

Coffee with 80 mL (⅓ cup) milk

Snack

1 kiwi30 g whole grain cereal with 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt 30 g whole grain cereal with 125 mL (½ cup) berries and 250 mL (1 cup) milk 30 g whole grain cereal with 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt and 125 mL (½ cup) berries

Lunch

Chicken sandwich made with 2 slices of whole grain bread and 75 g (2 ½ oz.) of chicken125 mL (½ cup) unsweetened applesauce

water

Lentil and vegetable soup made with 175 mL (¾ cup) lentils and 125 ml (½ cup) vegetables1 orange

1 pumpernickel bagel

water

Chicken sandwich made with 2 slices of whole grain bread and 75 g (2 ½ oz.) of chicken125 mL (½ cup) unsweetened applesauce

Tea with 80 mL (⅓ cup) milk

Snack

125 mL (½ cup) vegetable sticks 125 mL (½ cup) vegetable sticks 125 mL (½ cup) vegetable sticks

Supper

Carrot, turnip and beef stew made with 125 mL (½ cup) of carrots and turnips and 75 g (2 ½ oz.) beef125 mL (½ cup) mashed potatoes

250 mL (1 cup) of milk

Carrot, turnip and beef stew made with 125 mL (½ cup) of carrots and turnips and 75 g (2 ½ oz.) beef125 mL (½ cup) mashed potatoes

1 slice (35 g) cornbread

125 mL (½ cup) of milk

Carrot, turnip and beef stew made with 125 mL (½ cup) of carrots and turnips and 75 g (2 ½ oz.) beef125 mL (½ cup) mashed potatoes

1 slice (35 g) cornbread

250 mL (1 cup) of milk

Snack

6 whole wheat crackers50 g slice of cheese (1 ½ oz.) Tea with 80 mL (⅓ cup) milk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single dad with two teenagers

Michel is a single dad who lives with his teenagers Amanda and Jeremy. Amanda plays soccer and dances several times a week. Jeremy also plays soccer and is on the school basketball team. The teens are often hungry after their busy activities and get extra calories by eating an additional Food Guide Serving from the Vegetables and Fruit or Grain Products group. The kids make their lunch or buy their lunches at the school cafeteria. Dad is on the road a lot so buys something to eat on the run. The family eats supper together a few times a week.

Table – Examples of Meals for Different Families

Amanda
Age 15

Jeremy
Age 17

Michel
Age 52

Recommended Number of Food Guide Servings per day.

Vegetables and fruit

7 8 7

Grain Products

6 7 7

Milk and Alternatives

3 to 4 3 to 4 3

Meat and Alternatives

2 3 3

Meals

Breakfast

30 g cold cereal with 125 mL (½ cup) 2% milk1 medium pear 60 g cold cereal with 250 mL (1 cup) 2% milk1 medium pear 30 g cold cereal with 125 mL (½ cup) 2% milkcoffee with 60 mL (¼ cup) milk

1 medium pear

Snack

½ whole wheat bagel with 15 mL (1 Tbsp) peanut butter1 banana 1 banana 1 whole wheat bagel with 30 mL (2 Tbsp) peanut butter1 banana

Lunch

Chicken salad made with 250 mL (1 cup) romaine lettuce,
37.5 g (1 ¼ oz.) sliced cooked chicken125 mL (½ cup) baby carrots

1 whole wheat pita bread

250 mL container of milk.

Submarine sandwich made with 1 whole wheat bun, 75 g (2 ½ oz.) turkey, 125 mL (½ cup) tomato and sliced green peppers and 50 g (1 ½ oz.) cheese125 mL (½ cup) baby carrots

250 mL container of milk

Submarine sandwich made with 1 whole wheat bun, 75 g (2 ½ oz.) turkey, 125 mL (½ cup) tomato and sliced green peppers and 50 g (1 ½ oz.) cheese125 mL (½ cup) baby carrots

water

Snack

1 peach175 g (¾ cup) yogurt 2 peaches 1 peachTea with 60 mL (¼ cup) milk

Supper

75 g (2 ½ oz.) broiled salmon250 mL (1 cup) couscous

125 mL (½ cup) steamed broccoli

1 baked apple

250 mL (1 cup) of milk

75 g (2 ½ oz.) broiled salmon250 mL (1 cup) couscous

125 mL (½ cup) steamed broccoli

1 baked apple

250 mL (1 cup) of milk

75 g (2 ½ oz.) broiled salmon250 mL (1 cup) couscous

125 mL (½ cup) steamed broccoli

1 baked apple

250 mL (1 cup) of milk

Snack

6 whole grain crackers 1 whole wheat bagel with 30 mL (2 Tbsp) peanut butter

Love those leftovers safe food Ireland

 

Love those leftovers

Leftovers can be great, just make sure you make the most of them! Leftover turkey and ham should be covered and stored in the fridge within two hours of cooking. You can help it cool down by cutting it into smaller pieces. Once refrigerated, it should be eaten within three days. If you want to freeze stuffing or Christmas meats, wrap them in heavy freezer wrap and put in a container suitable for your freezer.

food containersWhen reheating Christmas leftovers, turkey and stuffing should be reheated until they are piping hot all the way through. Food should never be reheated more than once and leftover gravy should be brought to a rolling boil.

Leftovers are also a great way of making the most of your budget.

Downloads

0

- See more at: http://www.safefood.eu/Healthy-Eating/Seasonal-Features/Christmas-Tips-Advice/Love-those-leftovers.aspx#sthash.ddtHnQeK.dpuf

http://www.safefood.eu/Healthy-Eating/Seasonal-Features/Christmas-Tips-Advice/Love-those-leftovers.aspx

Take on the Take Away

 

Ingredients

  • Chicken KebabsFillet of free range chicken x 2, sliced lengthways
  • 80g flour
  • 100g fine breadcrumbs
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 4 mini pitta pockets, lightly toasted

For the chili jam

  • 1 red pepper, de-seeded & chopped
  • 2 chillies, de-seeded & chopped
  • 100g tinned tomatoes
  • 100g sugar
  • 1 inch of fresh ginger, grated

For the couscous, raisin and feta salad

  • 200g couscous
  • 50g feta cheese, cubed
  • 50g raisins
  • 350ml hot chicken stock
  • juice and zest of 1emon
  • ½ tsp each of ground cumin, cinnamon and coriander
  • Salt and pepper
  • Extra virgin olive oil

For the chips

  • 6 medium potatoes
  • 2 tbps olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Cayenne pepper
  • 200ml sour cream

Method

The chips

  1. Pre-heat eat your oven to 200ºC
  2. Wash & peel the potatoes and cut into finger-thick chips
  3. Drop the chips into a pot of boiling water, bring back to boil and simmer for 5 mins.
  4. Drain chips, allow to steam dry and place them in single layer in a roasting dish.
  5. Season to taste with salt, pepper and cayenne pepper.
  6. Drizzle the olive oil over the chips and toss until evenly coated.
  7. Place on the top shelf of the oven and cook for approx 20 mins, turning occasionally to produce a crisp chip.

For the couscous:

  1. Bring the chicken stock to the boil.
  2. Add the couscous, a little olive oil, and some salt and pepper
  3. Add the lemon zest, cumin, coriander & cinnamon, stir once
  4. Remove from the heat, cover pot tightly and allow to stand for about 5 mins or until the liquid is absorbed.
  5. Using a fork, fluff up the cooked couscous and transfer to a bowl.
  6. Allow to cool until tepid before adding remaining ingredients.
  7. Once cool, add the cubed feta, raisins and lemon juice with a little olive oil.
  8. Mix the salad gently until the ingredients are evenly distributed.
  9. Set aside until ready to serve.

Chicken goujons:

  1. Use three bowls – one each for flour, eggs and breadcrumbs.
  2. Dip the chicken strips in the flour, then into the egg and finally roll them in the breadcrumbs until evenly coated.
  3. Shallow fry the breaded goujons over a medium – low heat for about 3 mins on each side until golden and cooked through.

For the chilli jam

  1. Put all the red pepper, chillies, tomatoes, sugar and ginger in a food processor or blender and blitz a couple of times.
  2. Stop the blending when there is still some texture to the mixture.

To serve

  1. Make a slit in the pitta breads.
  2. Place 2 chicken goujons in each pocket.
  3. Ganish with a little chilli jam, couscous & sour cream.
  4. Serve with chips & couscous salad on the side.

If you want to cook a lower calorie version of this dish, here are some tips:

  • Perhaps you could have the couscous salad OR the chips. Having both on the side with these substantial kebabs means that the overall portion is very large.
  • Instead of crumbing the chicken, dust the chicken strips with caijun spice and stir fry in a little oil. This will help reduce the calorie count!
  • If you want to lower the sugar content of the home made chilli sauce, use a sugar substitute in this.
  • Some people may think substituting crème fraîche for the sour cream in this recipe reduces the calorie count. It doesn’t! Gram for gram, crème fraîche has almost double the calories of sour cream.

This recipe was taken from the Take on the Take Away series on RTE 1. More Take on the Take Away Recipes

- See more at: http://www.safefood.eu/Healthy-Eating/Recipes/Take-on-the-Take-Away/Clodagh-McKenna-s-Spicy-Chicken-Goujons-with-homem#sthash.alf4WMpC.dpuf

Chinese Turkey Kebabs with Noodles and Beansprouts Irish Heart Foundation.

 

988411_610777902318788_1098287883_n

 

http://www.irishheart.ie/iopen24/chinese-turkey-kebabs-with-noodles-beansprouts-t-7_22_1344_1355.html

 

Winter Warmers

 

Turkey, naturally low in fat, tastes really good with this Chinese sauce. Noodles are a good starch alternative to rice or pasta. The low calorie value also makes this a good choice for slimmers.

 

Chinese Turkey Kebabs with Noodles and Beansprouts

  • Preparation time: 10 minutes
  • Cooking time: 10 minutes
  • Freezing: No
  • Serves: 4 
 

what you need

450g/1lb turkey fillets, cut in strips
3 tablespoons dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon tomato purée
2 teaspoons sugar
150ml/0.25 pint hot chicken or vegetable stock
275g/10oz egg noodles
100g/4oz beansprouts 

what you do:
In a bowl mix together the soy sauce, tomato purée and sugar. Then pour half into a saucepan with the stock. Add the turkey strips to the remaining sauce in the bowl and stir to coat well. Thread the turkey strips on to 8 skewers, making a zigzag turkey pattern.

Grill or barbecue for about 6-8 minutes, turning every now and then, unitl evenly and thoroughly cooked. Meanwhile, put the noodles into a large saucepan, cover with boiling water, bring to the boil and simmer as directed on the packet. Bring the tomato sauce and stock to the boil, add the beansprouts and gently simmer for a few minutes. 

Drain the noodles, then add to the sauce and toss well. Divide between warmed plates (2 kebabs on each). Serve immediately with a tomato or other salad of your choice.

 

Note: This Chinese sauce can also be used on other meats and white fish.

 

 typical nutritional content – per portion
 Energy Kcal (Calories)          422
 Fat (g)                                    7.9
 of which saturates (g)            2.17
 Fibre (g)                                 2.6

http://www.irishheart.ie/iopen24/chinese-turkey-kebabs-with-noodles-beansprouts-t-7_22_1344_1355.html

Homemade fruity nutty muesli Safe Food Ireland

988411_610777902318788_1098287883_n

http://www.safefood.eu/Healthy-Eating/Recipes/Breakfast/Homemade-fruity-nutty-muesli

Homemade fruity nutty muesli

Suitable for vegetarians

 

Nuts are a fantastic source of protein and are rich in lots of minerals including iron, magnesium and zinc.

 

Ingredients – Serves 10 Adults

  • 200g / 7oz. of Muesli cereal base, or a mixture of rolled wheat and oats, available at most supermarkets
  • 100g / 3½oz. mixed dried fruit, try blueberries, cranberries, raisins and chopped apricots
  • 50g / 2oz. sesame seeds
  • 50g / 2oz. sunflower seeds
  • 100g / 3½oz. chopped mixed nuts, try brazil nuts, hazelnuts, walnuts and almonds

Method

  1. Mix all the ingredients together
  2. Store in an airtight container in a dark cupboard

Serving Suggestions

Serve with semi-skimmed milk or topped with low-fat yogurt and fresh fruit

infoThis homemade muesli is a quick, convenient and nutritious breakfast

Disclaimer

Click here for more details

Homemade fruity nutty muesli

Serves

10 Adults

10 Adults

Preparation Time

2 Minutes

2 Minutes

Cooking Time

2 Minutes

2 Minutes

Utensils Needed

Mixing Bowl

Mixing Bowl

228
Kcals
11%

Per Serving

HIGH
Fat
17%

11.9g Per Serving

MED
Sat Fat
8%

1.5g Per Serving

MED
Sugars
10%

9.4g Per Serving

LOW
Salt
2%

0.1g Per Serving

Nutrition Information
Typical Values Per 100g Per Portion (50g)
Energy 1906Kj 953Kj
456Kcal 228Kcal
Fat 23.8g 11.9g
(of which saturates) 3g 1.5g
Carbohydrate 41.9g 21g
(of which sugars) 18.8g 9.4g
Protein 14.5g 7.2g
Salt 0.2g 0.1g
Fibre 6.4g 3.2g
Related Documents

- See more at: http://www.safefood.eu/Healthy-Eating/Recipes/Breakfast/Homemade-fruity-nutty-muesli#sthash.EyRuELlP.dpuf

The provision of child size portions of adult meals in restaurants.

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The provision of child size portions of adult meals in restaurants.

Kids Size Me Initiative

http://www.nutritionandhealth.ie/Sectors/NHF/NHF.nsf/vPages/NHF_Initiatives~kids-size-me-initiative?OpenDocument

“The other immediately attractive things is the mention on the menu of half portions for children, charged at half the full portion price. A Nutrition and Health Foundation and Restaurant Association of Ireland initiative, Kids Size Me, lifts us out of the Bermuda triangle of nuggets, sausages and fish fingers into something much better”.

Catherine Cleary, Roadside Food worth stopping for Irish Times Magazine Eat Out review of the Fatted Calf Restaurant, Glasson, Co. Westmeath, 21st January 2012.

 is a joint initiative from the Nutrition & Health Foundation (NHF) and the Restaurants Association of Ireland (RAI) on the provision of child size portions of adult meals in restaurants.

The initiative aims to ensure children have access to healthier food options when dining out by making child size portions of adult meals available as an alternative to ordering from the standard children’s menu. Participating restaurants will carry the new  symbol on their menus and over the coming weeks consumers can log on to Wheretoeat.ie to see a list of participating venues. Participating restaurants will also carry a certificate.

Portion size affects energy intake in children from as young as 5 years of age. The balance between energy in and energy out is just as important for children as for adults and children simply should not be consuming adult portions at meal times. Given Ireland has one of the highest rates of childhood obesity in the world at 10% of children aged 5-12 years (IUNA 2005), it is essential to ensure children have access to healthier food options in the appropriate serving size and that this is actively promoted by restaurants.

The NHF are delighted to partner with the RAI to devise a set of voluntary guidelines that will be circulated to restaurant chefs and owners nationwide to assist them deliver good value, healthier menu options for children.

is only the beginning so both the NHF and RAI are open to consumer comments and feedback.

NHF RAI Kids Size Me Guidelines FINAL.pdfKids Size Me Certificate.pdf

OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AMONG 9-YEAR-OLDS Growing up in Ireland Report

To download a full copy of this report log onto http://www.growingup.ie/childpublications

Overall, 75% of nine-year-olds in the Growing Up in Ireland study were defined as being of healthy
BMI.

 

Levels of Overweight and Obesity in nine year olds.

 

  • 19% were overweight.
  • 7% were obese.
  • Girls are more likely to be defined as being overweight (22%)  or obese (8%) than boys (17% and 5%)
  • A total of 30% of girls and 22% of boys are defined as overweight/obese .

There are pronounced social-class inequalities in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among nine-year-olds. Using the Central Statistics Office’s measure of social class, the report shows that 19% of boys and 18% of girls from professional households are overweight/obese.

This increases to 29% of boys and 38% of girls from semi- and unskilled social-class households.

Levels of dietary quality, physical activity and sedentary behaviours vary significantly across child sex
and between social-class groups. Multivariate models show that, among boys, low levels of physical
exercise and high levels of sedentary behaviour were both associated with a higher risk of overweight
and obesity. Among girls, only low levels of physical exercise were associated with this. Although quality
of diet varied significantly across the sample, it is not a good predictor of the risk of overweight or
obesity.

http://www.growingup.ie/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/Second_Child_Cohort_Reports/Growing_Up_in_Ireland_-_Overweight_and_Obesity_Among_9-Year-Olds.pdf

Portion wise

BE WISE ABOUT YOUR PORTION SIZE campaign launched in Terenure!

myplate_green

A group of   parents in Terenure have launched a ‘healthy eating’ initiative to address the increasing trend towards childhood obesity. The goal of this “Be wise about your portion size” campaign is to promote healthier eating for our children by educating them on portion sizes and wise food choices.

Both St Joseph’s BNS and Presentation Primary School are already actively engaged, with teachers compiling  a “toolkit” document that will be taught to the pupils in the New Year. In order to reinforce this theme, each child will then design and decorate a portion plate to be displayed in the schools and local area. An information session for parents will be run to promote awareness, incorporating healthy eating demonstrations and lunch boxes tips. There will also be a learning session on food labels, daily healthy eating tips for school notice boards or PA system. These activities will lead up to a “Portion Wise” week in the community starting 3rd March 2014!

The local business community will be asked to support this initiative, with the ‘I Love Terenure’ network already engaged, and to assist with displaying posters, portion plates, healthy recipes and other activities


The overriding theme is to have the whole community involved, with the children at the heart.

BE WISE ABOUT YOUR PORTION SIZE campaign is a non-commercial community based project.